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Erie and Westmoreland Unneeded Heart Stents and Cardiac Procedures

Erie Cardiologist Perform Unneeded Cardiac Procedures

Have you received a Cardiac Procedure or coronary stent from Hamot Medical Center or Medicor Associates in Erie, Pennsylvania?

If you answered “yes” to any of the previous questions you need to seek the legal counsel of Joyce & Bittner Medical Malpractice attorneys in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Our lawyers are working with the resources you need to properly protect yourself and your family in the event you experienced unnecessary medical procedures. Call our medical malpractice lawyers today for a FREE CONSULTATION to see if you may have been the victim of a unneeded coronary or heart stent procedure.

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412-281-9919 or toll free at 1-800-299-5530
A recently filed law suit alleges that a number of questionable cardiac procedures were performed by Erie medical providers. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has reported that a physician has filed a law suit claiming that his former employer, Medicor and Associates, and UPMC Hamot Hospital performed unnecessary cardiac procedures in order to bill Medicare for the treatment. In addition to the situation in Erie, PA, last year it was reported that unnecessary stent procedures were done by physicians at Westmoreland Hospital in Greensbug, PA.

“The law suit sights eight examples of patients who received unnecessary medical procedures, including patient A.R., who received a cardiac catheterization in November 2004 based exclusively on false positive findings on a stress test, even though the patient had no symptoms.”

In another case, it is reported that a doctor “performed an unnecessary cardiac catheterization on patient L.J. on Sept. 12, 2003, and misinterpreted the results by grossly overstating the severity of stenosis.” The patient went on to be referred for unnecessary bypass surgery, according to the complaint, and died that October due to complications from the bypass surgery.

The Plaintiff in the law suit, Dr. Tullio Emanuele, claims that he began to notice high rates of surgical intervention among some doctors in the practice in 2004. Three of the doctors named in the law suit, had rates of intervention that were double the other rate of other members of the practice.

It is doubtful that the total number of patients affected by the alleged unnecessary medical procedures until the lawsuit proceeds to the point where the hospital and medical practice provide complete medical records.

“Lawsuits against doctors for implanting unneeded stents and doing other cardiac procedures are going on across the country. Westmoreland Hospital said last year it had identified 192 instances of possible unnecessary stents implanted by two physicians. The disclosure has resulted in at least 22 class action lawsuits. The case against Medicor and UPMC Hamot was filed in October of 2010 but originally was sealed, as is required in whistle-blower cases under the Federal False Claims Act. The U.S. attorney had the option of trying the case and declined to do so in October of 2011, at which point the case was unsealed, said Mr. Stone.” (source: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, “Doctors at Erie practice accused of unnecessary medical procedure,” Anya Sostek, January 23 2012)

Understanding your rights as a patient can be complicated. Our medical malpractice attorneys can help review your medical records from the Erie cardiologist practice Medicor and Associates and UPMC Hamot, to see if you may be a victim of an unneeded heart stent procedure. Our team is also accepting the patients from the Westmoreland Hospital coronary stent complaints, to help any and all patients who feel they received a heart stent unnecessarily or any other cardiac procedure.

The law firm of Joyce & Bittner and their team of medical malpractice attorneys will help you figure out if you were given an unneeded coronary stent. Contact one of our medical malpractice lawyers today to get started Call 412-281-9919 or toll free at 1-800-299-5530 Today!